Hydroponics and Worms

Ventured out to the WindHorse Wellness Center this past weekend for a review on worm composting.  My little guys weren’t doing as well as expected (imagine that)  and I wanted to know why?   Why would any worm want to escape from the fabulous Wormery Lodge crafted especially for them? 

They can’t deny it.  I know some of them made a break for it by the dried carcass I spotted on the garage floor.  I would have attributed it to another case of stray-crazy-worm-syndrome, save for the few that continued to loiter near the lid of my container. 

Hmph.  The nerve.  To think I showered them with daily visits of spritz and scraps.  But seeing no sense in dwelling in the misery–and having no interest in repeating the misfortune–I decided to consult with the experts.  You can imagine my delight when the serendipity of coincidence landed this wonderful email in my inbox:  Lesson in worm composting this weekend at WindHorse!

Well, glory be!  Could the heavens be nudging me in that direction?  (Of course.  How else do you think that message ended up in my mailbox?)  So away I went where I met the sensational Angela Ringler — one of the eco-fabulous Green Girls from www.KarmaFarmOnline.com (the place to buy eco-friendly products) and learned everything I needed to know about worm composting.  Does this woman know about worms!

She gave an excellent demonstration using a specially made worm composter.  Granted, this one was a far cry from my do-it-yourself doozy, but “style” wasn’t my problem.  Getting up close and personal with her worms, I realized it was far more serious.

I’d been dooped.  Unintentionally, I’m sure, but my local angler was incorrect when he cited the worms he carried were red wigglers.  (I think.)  Sure, they wiggled a lot, but they weren’t as red as Angela’s.  Hers were red-red–worm red, brick red.  Plain red

Mine?  While mine were gorgeous, they lacked the rosy rouge of her girls and stood bland by comparison.  So, I set them free into my compost pile near the garden, with the very high hopes they may find their way into my veggie patch.  Remember the old saying?  “If you love something, set it free.  If it doesn’t come back, it was never meant to be yours.  But if it does, love it forever.”  To my worms I say this isn’t goodbye…it’s simply until we meet again.

Enough drama.  The point remains, her composter was awesome, easy and stink-free.  So lovely, she keeps it in her house!  Love that convenience.  Would get one for myself, but besides the fact my family eats too much for the composter she utilized, I have no place to put it.  Thank goodness she showed us how to make the perfect at-home bin!  Would you believe it looks a lot like mine

Two simple improvements to my bin and we’re in business!  Number one:  add a piece of screen mesh to the lid.  This covers the holes, provides excellent escape prevention, yet maintains plenty of air circulation.  Number two:  add a spigot to one end, bottom center.  As worms eat, they not only poop, but pee.  (Gee, did we forget that little fact?  Where are those birds and bees when we need them!)   This liquid is like a magic tea.  You spritz it on your plants for not only great nutrient supply, but disease and bug control to boot!   Who knew! 

While at WindHorse, I had the pleasure of viewing their hydroponic towers; the perfect solution for small spaces with minimal mess.  Don’t they just look easy?  Plants are said to grow up to 50% faster, because they don’t expend unnecessary energy growing roots through soil in search of nutrients.  It’s readily available in the liquid solution.   And if this wasn’t enough good news, this system uses about 10% of the water consumed by traditional crops.  Wow.   These berries are a beautiful testament, wouldn’t you agree? 

And you’re not limited to the smaller plants, either.  During a brief stroll through the hydroponic garden, I learned you can also grow tomatoes this way.  Just look at this beast! 

Simply flourishing–robust and green.  The iron fence next to this tower lends needed support (which I highly recommend).  My thanks to Al–resident hydroponic gardener–for his allowing my unexpected visit!  Would make an excellent field trip

In fact, March 19-20 they’re hosting their WindHorse Equinox, “a festival of international food & fun!”   Sounds like great times, but better than food, there will be a fellow on site giving a class on how to make your own hydroponic system.  Is that great, or what? 

Can’t wait.  And can’t wait to get my red wigglers.  In fact, I’m going to Karma Farm online to buy my next batch.  This way I’ll be sure to get the real thing.  For hydroponic growing centers in your area, check with your local agriculture department for a listing.  Or surf the web!  Amazing the amount of information available at your fingertips these days.  Have fun!

One Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Ryan
    Feb 16, 2011 @ 13:49:52

    I love it! The whole worm composting thing, I mean, have you ever heard of a big time yuck factor? hmmmm

    Reply

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